Fireweed

Fireweed

Fireweed, a member of the willow plant family, is distinguished by its gorgeous magenta flowers. Its common name comes from its sudden appearance after a wildfire. It may be a colourful addition to sunny, damp areas. It grows fast by rhizomes and requires little upkeep once established. It cannot, however, withstand competition; if other species…

Hoary Vervain

Hoary Vervain

The hoary vervain, or Verbena stricta, is a type of herbaceous plant falling under the Verbenaceae family. The flowering plant is most commonly found in different states of the United States, namely Nebraska, Iowa, South Dakota, North Dakota, Oklahoma, and Kansas, among many others. While it is native to most of the states, it has…

Rhodora
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Rhodora

Rhodora is a thin, erect-branched shrub that seldom grows taller than 3-4 feet. This small northern shrub has stunning blooms that appear before or alongside the leaves. Rhodora canadensis, also known as Canada rosebay, is a deciduous shrub native to northeastern North America and a member of the heath family. It is most commonly found…

Spotted Beebalm

Spotted Beebalm

The Spotted Beebalm is an unusual beauty in form and colour, distinguished by its pagoda-like blossoms. It has eye-catching clusters of creamy purple-spotted tubular blooms sitting on pink, lavender, or ivory bracts. Flowering starts in mid-summer and continues into the fall. Spotted Beebalm, a member of the mint family, has a sweet and pleasant scent….

Smooth Solomon’s Seal

Smooth Solomon’s Seal

Smooth Solomon’s Seal (Polygonatum commutatum) is a drought tolerant perennial for the shade garden, native to Ontraio and Eastern North America. It adds a unique architectural structure with its arching foliage and white bell shaped flowers that dangle along the leaves. It is rhizomatous with lustrous, alternate leaves. You might be interested in learning more…

Plants that Attract Monarch Butterflies
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Plants that Attract Monarch Butterflies

Monarch butterflies are superb pollinators, and if they are fed plants they enjoy, they will pollinate your entire garden. Butterflies require two kinds of plants to survive: host plants and food plants. Plant a monarch butterfly garden because their populations have been progressively dropping in recent decades, mostly due to habitat loss and pesticide usage….

2018 Garden Trends: Containers, Privacy, Pollinators

2018 Garden Trends: Containers, Privacy, Pollinators

With a year of conferences, tests, trials and garden visits under our belts, we’re excited to tell you about the big ideas we think will be influencing the gardening world in the months ahead. Beyond popular colors and new varieties, big-picture themes always emerge on the world (gardening) stage that prompt designers and plant breeders to shift their work towards our changing needs. This year, most of what we see heading your way has to do with population, technology, cooperation over competition, and plants that solve problems. Keep reading to see what we’ve been taking note of!

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