Wood Betony

Wood Betony

Wood Betony is a valuable native flower that is an indicator of pristine prairies. Its’ roots attach to the roots of nearby plants and uptake nutrients. Thereby, wood betony parasitizes other plants, using them as a water and nutrient source. This parasitism helps reduce the vigor of the tall prairie plants.

Blue Cohosh

There are two species of Blue Cohosh: Caulophyllum thalictroides and Caulophyllum giganteum. Caulophyllum thalictroides (Blue Cohosh) generally has lighter greenish flowers which bloom after the leaves have opened. Caulophyllum giganteum (Giant Blue Cohosh) has dark purple/red flowers which open with or before the leaves.

Wintergreen

Excellent ground cover for shady areas auch as woodland gardens, rock gardens, foundations or native plant areas. Plants are an interesting complement to other acid-loving shrubs such as azaleas, rhododendrons, kalmias and blueberries.

Blue-eyed Grass

Blue-Eyed Grass Sisyrinchium montanum can be a shy retiring plant at times. They are small perennials only 10-30 cm tall (4-12”), with narrow leaves to 3mm wide (1/8”). They start opening their eyes in early June and continue to look around all through June. They often grow in places with little competition from other plants….

Lesser pyrole

A bit of a mystery plant, there is very little information on it. Research shows 5 main types of Pyrola plants. Wintergreens prefer damp and shady locations in woods. They are often rather local in distribution but can be locally common especially in their more northern locations.

Smooth Solomon’s Seal

Polygonatum commutatum (great solomon seal) is a drought tolerant native Ontario perennial for the shade garden. It adds a unique architectural structure with its arching foliage and white bell shaped flowers that dangle along the leaves. In autumn the leaves of Solomon’s seal turn a vivid and saturated yellow, shading fat purple fruit, and adding…

Bellwort

Bellwort is an excellent early-blooming native shade plant for the woodland garden, shaded border front, wildflower garden or naturalized area. It spreads slowly by rhizomes so you can achieve a mass planting look under shade trees or along wood margins in a relatively short amount of time. The Bellwort flowers and leaves have an overall…

White Trillium

The white trillium (Trillium grandiflorum), also known as the wake-robin and the white lily, was officially adopted as Ontario’s floral emblem in 1937. The white trillium blooms in late April and May. The blooms are very sensitive to light, and the white flowers usually bend toward the sun as it moves across the sky. Contrary…

Purple Trillium

The red trillium, also known as the wake robin, sports the traditional three petal design while instead of clean linen white petals it sports deep maroon red blooms. This spring blooming flower prefers acidic soil. Indigenous groups used the root of Purple Trillium as an aid to childbirth. The whole plant was made into a…

Trout Lily

The mottled leaves of the Trout Lily are said to resemble the markings on trout. In most populations, non-flowering individuals outnumber the flowering ones. The Cherokee crushed the warmed leaves and poured the juice over wounds that would not heal. These are extremely photogenic plants that dapple the early spring woods with their beautiful yellow….

That's All Folks!

That's All Folks!